REVIEW: The Unreleased Beatles

Music and FilmThere are few titles that I put on my short list of essential Beatle-bookshelf titles, and The Unreleased Beatles by Richie Unterberger is one of them.  You know those books that every Beatle fan should own….this title belongs right next to Mark Lewisohn’s mammoth and highly revered Complete Beatles Chronicle.  You know that kind of importance. It is essential reading to the collector, fan, and bootleg afficiando. Even if you have a modest interest in Beatle bootleged recordings you should get this book, this book will whet your appetite to want to seek out these recordings.  If you are a hard core collector this book will provide you with a wealth of information about the recordings that you will not find anywhere else.  Do not stop, go straight to your bookseller and get it. It is going on the top of my Christmas list.

It is the most thoroughly researched book on Beatle bootleg recordings that I have ever seen.  Most of these titles, while well researched are dry.  This one reads like a treasure hunt.

The only other titles that even compare to this on bootleg recordings are those impressive titles written by John Winn, and this book even gives them a run for the money, because it is something you can pick up and come back to many times and find something new every time.   Plus, it really does look pretty on my coffee table.  Several friends have commented about the book when coming over, and it has spawned several conversations and subsequent bootleg listening parties with book in hand. 

The book description reads:
The Unreleased Beatlesdetails the incredible wealth of music that the Beatles recorded but did not release. A staggering amount of material is examined, from unreleased studio outtakes, live concert performances, home demo recordings, fan club Christmas recordings, and other informal demos done outside of EMI studios. The book includes chronological entries for all of the Beatles’s unreleased recordings of note from 1957–1970, including special information on BBC radio recordings from 1962–1965. There’s also details on unreleased video footage of note from 1961–1970 and outtakes from 1990s interviews filmed for Anthology. An entire section is dedicated to covering Beatles bootlegs, Beatles songs recorded by other artists in the 1960s, and never-recorded material. Lastly, the book includes rare stills from film footage of the group that hasn’t been made commercially available.

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One Response

  1. I am a fan of Ian MacDonald’s Revolution in the Head.

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